ADOBE ENABLES TO SHOOT AND EDIT DNG RAW PHOTOS WITH LATEST LIGHTROOM...

ADOBE ENABLES TO SHOOT AND EDIT DNG RAW PHOTOS WITH LATEST LIGHTROOM APP UPDATE

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Adobe has announced the update 2.5 to their popular Lightroom Mobile app. The new update adds the ability to shoot directly to Adobe’s open source raw file format, DNG, avoiding the compression and data loss inherent in standard JPEG files. To capture in DNG, users will need a device running iOS 10 that has a 12 MP sensor, such as the iPhone 6s, iPhone 6s Plus, iPhone SE, and iPad Pro 9.7. When available, the iPhone 7 and iPhone 7 Plus will also support capturing in DNG format. The latest update is available in the App Store at the time of this writing.

One of the major downsides of shooting photos on your iPhone is the limitations of JPEG files as far as editing flexibility. Apple announced the added capability of shooting raw images with the iPhone 7, and Adobe is the first company to implement that functionality in their app.

  • New Adobe DNG Support

    Lightroom 2.5’s in-app camera adds in the ability to capture directly in DNG format.

    lightroom-2-5-dng-capture-screenshot

    The DNG file format is an open source raw file format developed by Adobe that offers far more quality and control than either the JPEG or TIFF file formats. With the DNG format, you get:

    • The highest possible image quality because DNG files contain all the data from the camera sensor without the compression artifacts that you find in JPEG formatted photos.
      JPEG compression is often good enough for photos that don't need to be edited, but once for those photos that need to be enhanced, the compression can get in the way. This image has obvious JPEG compression artifacts on the right side of the image.

      JPEG compression is often good enough for photos that don’t need to be edited, but for those photos that need to be enhanced, the compression can get in the way. This image has obvious JPEG compression artifacts on the right side of the image.

    • Freedom to experiment with the ability to change the white balance even after capturing, something that is not possible with a JPEG or TIFF formatted photo.
      White Balance Variations

      By shooting in Adobe DNG, you can experiment with different white balances even after capturing the photo with no loss of quality. Three different white balance options were compared in the image above to find the one that most closely matched the feeling of the original scene.

    • More latitude when capturing difficult scenes thanks to a greatly expanded dynamic range within your image, which provides the ability to recover highlight information that would have otherwise been discarded if shooting in JPEG or TIFF formats.
      JPEG vs DNG Highlight Recovery

      In order to capture shadow detail, this image was metered from the shadows, resulting in blown out highlights. The DNG version on the right enabled the highlights to be recaptured without issue.

    • The ability to push your images further thanks to having access to all of the color and tonal information found in your camera’s sensor, which is thrown away when shooting in the JPEG file format.

To capture in DNG, you’ll need a device running iOS 10 that has a 12MP sensor such as the iPhone 6s, iPhone 6s Plus, iPhone SE, and iPad Pro 9.7. When available, the iPhone 7 and iPhone 7 Plus will also support capturing in DNG format.

In addition to DNG support, the Lightroom Mobile 2.5 update also adds support for the new wide gamut P3 color space available on the iPad Pro 9.7 and the iPhone 7 and 7 Plus.

This wide gamut color space provides 25% more color than the sRGB color space, ensuring that any edits you make in Lightroom accurately reflect any the colors in your photos.

Write what you feel about this update in the comments below.

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